Should I DNF Books Debate

To DNF or Not to DNF? Join the Debate!

I actually can’t remember the last time I DNFed a book. In fairness, a lot of the books I read are for my degree modules so kind of require me to power through, but even when reading for pleasure I tend to cling on until the bitter end.

Over the years since I started blogging, I have noticed that so many other book bloggers aren’t afraid to call it a day if they’re not hooked after x number of chapters. This has got me thinking – could becoming a more ruthless DNFer improve my reading life? Continue reading To DNF or Not to DNF? Join the Debate!

Selected Poems by TS Eliot Book Cover Image

Questioning the Canon: T.S. Eliot and Adrienne Rich

Questioning the Canon: T.S. Eliot and Adrienne Rich

Questioning the Canon is a new feature in which I hope to bring to light lesser-known books about a certain issue, which can be read alongside or instead of infamous ‘classics’. Today, I will be comparing the poetry of T.S. Eliot and Adrienne Rich… Continue reading Questioning the Canon: T.S. Eliot and Adrienne Rich

Titus Andronicus by William Shakespeare Book Cover Image

Questioning the Canon: William Shakespeare and Thomas Middleton

Questioning the Canon is a new feature in which I hope to bring to light lesser-known books about a certain issue, which can be read alongside or instead of infamous ‘classics’.

People are starting to discuss whether the authors we hold up as cultural icons – Shakespeare, Dickens, Wordsworth – should be accompanied by previously marginalised writers. Our idea of what constitutes ‘great literature’ is becoming broader. 

This can only be a good thing, as it means more diversity and social representation in what we read! Continue reading Questioning the Canon: William Shakespeare and Thomas Middleton

The History of Mary Prince Book Cover Image

Questioning the Canon: Harriet Beecher Stowe and Mary Prince

Questioning the Canon is a new feature in which I hope to bring to light lesser-known books about a certain issue, which can be read alongside or instead of infamous ‘classics’.

People are starting to discuss whether the authors we hold up as cultural icons – Shakespeare, Dickens, Wordsworth – should be accompanied by previously marginalised writers. Our idea of what constitutes ‘great literature’ is becoming broader. 

This can only be a good thing, as it means more diversity and social representation in what we read! Continue reading Questioning the Canon: Harriet Beecher Stowe and Mary Prince

Doctor Faustus Christopher Marlowe Book Cover Image

Questioning the Canon: William Shakespeare and Christopher Marlowe

Questioning the Canon is a new feature in which I hope to bring to light lesser-known books about a certain issue, which can be read alongside or instead of infamous ‘classics’.

People are starting to discuss whether the authors we hold up as cultural icons – Shakespeare, Dickens, Wordsworth – should be accompanied by previously marginalised writers. Our idea of what constitutes ‘great literature’ is becoming broader. 

This can only be a good thing, as it means more diversity and social representation in what we read! Continue reading Questioning the Canon: William Shakespeare and Christopher Marlowe

Wide Sargasso Sea Jean Rhys Book Cover Image

Questioning the Canon: Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea

Questioning the Canon is a new feature in which I hope to bring to light lesser-known books about a certain issue, which can be read alongside or instead of infamous ‘classics’.

People are starting to discuss whether the authors we hold up as cultural icons – Shakespeare, Dickens, Wordsworth – should be accompanied by previously marginalised writers. Our idea of what constitutes ‘great literature’ is becoming broader. 

This can only be a good thing, as it means more diversity and social representation in what we read! Continue reading Questioning the Canon: Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea